Bread – Pollution

May 9, 2016


Psalm 19

“The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims His handiwork.”  Ps. 19:1

Really?  When I was a little boy and I looked up at the sky at night while I was on my back, the enormity of the universe pressed its presence into my mind.  Thousands and thousands and thousands of stars looked down on me through the black night, some large and some small, some dim and some bright.  And some were so numerous and so close together that they formed bands of light which formed a wave through the sky.  I learned later that this was the constellation of stars known as the Milky Way.  All this was apparent from the naked eye because I had no telescope and no means to obtain one.  But that was OK, because all of it was apparent to me.  And as a young boy, I marveled and wondered.  And through this wondering, I began to come to an understanding of the Creator, whose glory filled the night skies.

However, today, when I look at the night sky, I might see a few stars poking through, maybe the moon, and maybe an airplane with its lights on.  Is the glory of God, the evidence of His power and majesty, gone?  Has it been diminished through the years so that the Maker of the universe is now only capable of putting out only a few stars at night?

Well, the reason I can’t see the heavens anymore from my front yard is that I live in North Texas, home to millions of people and their lights.  So the sky suffers with what is called “light pollution” and the glory of God is diminished by the works of man.

And isn’t this just the perfect example of how man is always interfering with God’s revelation to us?  God reveals Himself in the heavens and His glory is apparent to everyone, until man floods the night sky with man-made lights, man-made pollution.

And the wonder of God fills the mind of a little boy, until the boy receives the world’s education, the world’s “science teaching,” the world’s way of looking at things, and the glory of God is clouded in a mist of pollution created by man, His presence and power and glory diminished by man’s works, by man’s pollution.

We pollute God’s Work with our ideas, our explanations, our theories, our “facts,” our conclusions, our logic, our education, our knowledge, and our “wisdom.”  Is it any wonder that we see God dimly through the dense fog of man’s doings?

And yet, what happens when we leave the city for the country and we get away from the light pollution?  Voila!  The universe reappears with all of its stars, and the apparent power, wisdom, glory, and love of God in creating such a lightshow for us becomes, again, apparent.

“The heavens declare the glory of God,…,” but only if you can see them.  And to do that, you have to escape the pollution, escape the world, and then you have to look up with the eyes of a little boy or girl, unencumbered by the world’s education, knowledge, and “science.”

When we take the time from our busy lives to make a place for us and God to meet in fellowship, it is as if we have escaped to the country, shed our pollution, and stared into the Creation and its Maker.  What a wonderful place this is?  Full of wonder and simplicity and acceptance and power and majesty!  Full of the presence of God.

When we stare up to heaven through our light-polluted night skies, we do not see nothing.  We may only see a couple of stars, but those are a foretaste of what lays beyond.

God may penetrate the fog of our pollution with only a couple of points of light, but they are there as evidence of something greater beyond.

We may be in a fog of light pollution and can only see a couple of stars, but we know that there is more where those came from.  We may be in a fog of depression and can only see a couple of points of light, shadows of hope, but they are there and there is more where those came from.  We may be in the darkness of man’s teaching and man’s wisdom and can only see a couple of pieces of evidence of something beyond us, but those pieces of light are there and there is more where those came from.

The evidence for God is there to be seen if we have but eyes to see.  To begin, escape the pollution, regard the universe, look up … and revel in God’s revelation of Himself to you!

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© 2016 GBF   All Scripture quotations are from the English Standard Version (2001), unless otherwise indicated.

 

 

 

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Bread – Wonderful

August 13, 2014


Readings for Wednesday, August 13, 2014, designated by the 1979 Book of Common Prayer: Judges 13:15-24; Acts 6:1-15; John 4:1-26; Psalms 101,109,119:121-144

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Wonderful, full of wonder. How many times have we really been confronted with something wonderful in our lives? I can think of at least two. One is being in the delivery room watching our first baby being born. A second is an answer to prayer, when I asked for the Lord to reveal Himself in my life and was confronted with a glorious crown while I was driving home into a setting sun casting its light into a cloud-crown. And, of course, now I begin to recall two, I can recall many, many more.

In our readings today, we are witnesses to three wonderful moments. In Judges, Samson’s mother and father are speaking to an angel. When they ask the angel’s name, the response is that the angel’s name is too wonderful to comprehend.

In Acts, Stephen is being tried to for blasphemy upon false allegations. While he was standing there, “all who sat in the council saw that his face was like the face of an angel.” Acts 6:15

In John, the Samarian woman at the well is talking to Jesus and tells Him that she is aware of the coming of Messiah. Jesus responds “I who speak to you am He.” John 4:26.

In the first reading, the wonder is in the name of God’s emissary. In the second reading, the wonder is in the face of God’s disciple. In the third reading, the wonder is in the Word of God, spoken, written, and incarnate.

What can surpass these wonders – the day we discover that there is a God and His name is wonderful, the day we meet a Christian who is the face and hands of God on earth, and the day God engages=s us in a conversation with Him when He reveals Himself … and all pretense disappears into the reality of God-on-earth?

The day Jesus meets us at our well, the day He reaches out His sovereign hand to save us from our sin, the day we learn the reality of God, the day we look into our past and see what God has saved us from, the day we look into eternity and see what God has saved us to, the day we look in the mirror and see that God is transforming us into Him, just like He did Stephen – those are days of wonder, those are wonderful.

How many wonderful days have we had? The truth is that every day since we have been saved by grace has been wonderful.

Now, Lord, give us eyes to see….and be grateful.

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© 2014 GBF

Bread – Miracles

September 11, 2013


Readings for Wednesday, September 11, 2013, designated by the 1979 Book of Common Prayer: 1 Kings 17:1-24; Phil. 2:1-11; Matt. 2:1-12; Psalms 49,53,119:49-72

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In 1 Kings today, we read about a woman who has shown hospitality to a prophet of God, Elijah, and whose son has just died. The mother gets angry at Elijah, accusing him of bringing tragedy to her home because of her sins. Elijah takes the boy to his room, lays on him, and prays to God three times to let the child’s life come back into him. “And the Lord listened to the voice of Elijah/ And the life of the child came into him again, and he revived.” 1 Kings 17:22

This was a miracle and the woman responded to the amazing, supernatural event by saying to Elijah “Now I know that you are a man of God, and that the word of the Lord in your mouth is truth.” 1 Kings 17:24. The woman recognized the miracle of her son’s revival from the dead, and acknowledged it, saying that she now believed.

This woman is so much like us. For a miracle from God, we look for the amazing event, the circumstance which could only have been put together by God. We expect spectacular results, a mountaintop religious experience. If there are fireworks of sight, that is a great add-on, but we’ll take fireworks of experience as a substitute.

But there are other kinds of miracles all around us, which when we think about them add up to a miraculous experience, mundane yes, but miraculous nonetheless. It is the miracles of everyday life which should drive us to our knees.

The widow in our story had actually experienced one of these mundane miracles many times previously. When Elijah first met her, the widow was at her wits end. She had no money and only enough food to last for one more meal. She had no help apparently from her neighbors, and she was preparing for she and her son to die. When she showed hospitality to Elijah by sharing what little she had with him (at his request), her pantry was never empty after that – “The jar of flour was not spent, neither did the jug of oil become empty …” 1 Kings 17:16.

But this daily miracle, this provision of God literally from thin air, from left field, was not enough for the widow to declare that Elijah was a man of God. God’s miracle stared her in the face every day at every meal, and yet it was not enough to recognize the presence of God in her surroundings. She harbored doubts until the “big” miracle happened.

And, like I said, isn’t this woman so much like us. For the moment, sit back and drop the pretense of knowledge, the veneer of science and education, the chimera of reason. Just drop them and look around. Isn’t it a miracle that every day we are warmed by the sun? Isn’t it a miracle that our farms produce good food for us and that our cupboards have any food at all in them? Isn’t it a miracle that, whether I live a shack or a mansion, that I live at all? Isn’t it a miracle that we have a God who cares so much for us that He has saved us when we cannot save ourselves?

When we look at a young child in new circumstances, we see wonder and curiosity in their eyes, words, and behavior. What happened to the wonder in our lives, in our eyes, in our words, and in our behavior?

What if we couldn’t explain things? Would we then be excited about the miracles that surround us all the time?

This is not a plea to toss away reason or education or knowledge. It is a plea that these not be shrouds and blinders by which we are covered up, hidden from God’s wonders.

You want to know that God is real and His Word is truth? Walk outside and look around. Look inside yourself and walk around. And then give thanks to God, for it is His miracle which caused us to be borne, His miracle which causes us to be sustained in this life, and His miracle which will bring us into relationship with Jesus Christ and eternal life.

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© 2013 GBF

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