Bread – Resolved

December 30, 2016


Psalm 45

Hear, O daughter, and consider … Since He is your Lord, bow to Him.”   Ps. 45:10-11

This is the third step in the process of our glorification as Christ’s bride.  The pre-step is God’s choice of His bride.  The first step was for us to hear and incline ourselves toward God.  The second step is then for us to forget our past, pick up our cross, and follow Him.

This third step is encapsulated in the Psalmist’s simple statement that we, as Christ’s bride, should “bow to Him,” since He is our Lord.

 

This simple command sounds strange to Western ears, and particularly to Americans, where we say proudly that “we bow down to no man.”  But, of course, Jesus is God, so he is not mere man.  But, still, we like to think of ourselves as equal to God and, therefore, it is easier in our mindset to call Him “friend” then it is to call Him “Lord.”

But for the wedding feast to be truly glorious, for the bride to enjoy all of the benefits of hope, peace, love, and charity which God brings into the relationship, the bride must bow, the bride must be obedient to the Lord’s commands.

As we reach the end of the year and look forward to the new year, it is time for reflection and resolution, reflection on the past and resolution for the future.

As we look over the past year in our walk with God, have we really, really been obedient to His call on our lives, to His commands for life, or to His personal request that we become holy like He is?  We may have heard the good news of Christ and inclined our ear, and we may have gathered around us our church friends, leaving our past behind, but have we really “bowed to Him?”  Have we given up our selfish ways?  Have we subordinated self to His glory, His ways, His truth, and His life?  Instead of just asking ourselves “What would Jesus do,” have we actually done what Jesus has told us to do?

Many of us, myself included, are weak Christians.  We talk a game, but we do not walk it.  We have heard the good news and proclaim trust in Christ, but we trust ourselves and our friends and our wealth and the world more.  We do not walk in holiness; in fact, if we are honest, we barely make acquaintance with the concept.

But that is the past, and it need not be the future.  The work of God is to transform us, first by giving us a new life in Him and then training us, bringing us up from infants into maturity as His disciples.

Let’s all take on a New Year’s resolution that very well may be the hardest thing we have ever done.  Let us resolve to begin each day by “bowing to Him.”  Let’s be obedient to our Lord.

What does this look like?  I think it is simpler than we think.  If He says love, we love.  If He says rest, we rest.  If He says talk to Me, we talk to Him.  If He says “walk through that door,” we take the step of faith into the unknown (to us).

Resolved, that I put Him first and me second.  And for that, we need help.  Come Holy Spirit!

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© 2016 GBF   All Scripture quotations are from the English Standard Version (2001), unless otherwise indicated.

 

 

 

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Bread – Forget

December 28, 2016


Psalm 45

“Hear, O daughter and … forget your people and your father’s house, …” Ps. 45:10

There are three stages in the process of coming to Christ and a pre-stage.  All of these are dealt with in this Psalm, written many, many years before the first Christmas, before the Incarnation.

The pre-stage is the setting of the entire Psalm.  The King is coming for His bride.  How does He know who that is.  The pre-stage is where God has chosen His bride from the beginning of the world.  He has chosen her and now the Psalm shift to the three stages of the bride’s coming to Christ, of her preparation for His appearance on her doorstep.

The first stage we considered in the last Bread, although we did not call it that.  It is the admonition that the bride must hear, consider, and incline her ear.  She must hear the good news of the gospel, that Christ has come into the world to save her.  She must hear the words of invitation, consider them deeply, and respond by leaning toward Christ (inclining her ear).  The stages do not begin if she cannot or will not hear.  Because she is dead in her sin, this too is not a work of hers but a work of God, that she has the power and has received the grace to hear what the Lord says to her.  It is a call made to the world, but it is only heard by a few, those chosen as bride.

The second stage is repentance from sin and turning toward God.  What is repentance of sin?  It is “forgetting your people and your father’s house.”

Although we may reside in the world, our life is in the kingdom of God once we become Christ’s disciples.  We love the people in the world, but not the world.  We rest in our house, but our house is not what possesses us.  To serve Christ as His disciple, we must “forget” the past, rest in Christ in the present, and otherwise stand in the evil day.  Jesus said it Himself, “A person’s enemies will be those of his own household.  Whoever loves father or mother more than Me is not worthy of Me, and whoever loves son or daughter more than Me is not worthy of Me.  And whoever does not take his cross and follow Me is not worthy of Me.  Whoever finds his life shall lose it, and whoever loses his life for My sake will find it.”  Mt. 10:36-39.

There is hardly anything to be gained by having one foot in the world and the other in the kingdom of God.  If we are to follow Christ as His bride, we must follow Him and not the world; we must forget the world and leave it behind.

How easy to say and how hard to do!  How can we “forget” the world when we are surrounded by it; how can we “forget” the office when our phones ring with office needs and our schedules have appointments throughout the day?

How can we “forget” when the world will not let us “forget.”

The truth is that we will never “forget” if the word means that we will have no memory of it (which is what most people think it means).  We have our memories and some of them are treasured and some are not, but unless one can hypnotize oneself and live in an alternative universe, we have our memories.  But memories are nothing but that unless they retain power over us, unless they guide what we say and how we behave.  In that sense, “forget” means not to lose memory, but to lose the power the memory has over our behavior and actions.  “Forget” in this sense means that, since we follow Christ, it is the memory of Him and His Word in Scripture which drives our actions, not the memory of the world.  For example, the memory of the world is that love is often returned with hurt so we should be careful; the memory of Christ is that love will not necessarily be reciprocated, but love anyway in abundance.  If we do not forget the world, we will be shy in our ambassadorship for Christ; if we forget the world with eyes fixed on Jesus, we will be bold in our speech and our actions.

How do we break that link between the past and the present?  How do we “forget your people and your father’s house?”

The apostles asked a similar question of Jesus in John:  “What must we do…?”  And Jesus’ response was “This is the work of God, that you believe in Him whom He has sent.”  Jn. 6:28b-29

The work of God, and not of ourselves, is that we are empowered and enabled to believe and to grow in grace and love.  To do so, we must forget our ties to the world so that we can be used as Christ’s agents in the world.  How do we forget our ties?  The work of God is this, that ….”

Come, Holy Spirit, and empower us today to forget the world and remain fixed on Him and His work on earth, so that we can begin this new year right around the corner fully armed in the Spirit for the battle which is here.  Amen.

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© 2016 GBF   All Scripture quotations are from the English Standard Version (2001), unless otherwise indicated.

 

 

Bread – Christmas

December 24, 2016


Psalm 45

You are the most handsome of the sons of men; grace is poured upon Your lips…In Your majesty ride out victoriously for the cause of truth and meekness and righteousness…Your throne, O God, is forever and ever…Therefore, God, Your God, has anointed You….”  Ps. 45:1-7

I have not written Bread for over two weeks.  It seemed like every time I tried, something happened.  I could not even pick up a Bible to read the appointed Psalms.  Until this morning, Christmas Eve.

And now I know why, because it is appropriate that we start the appointed Psalm, Psalm 45, today, Christmas Eve.

The Psalmist is addressing the King of Kings, the “most handsome of the sons of men.”  To be the person addressed by the Psalmist, Jesus had to be born as a “son of man.”  The Psalmist addresses the King born of flesh.  Christmas had to come for this Psalm to take shape.

But the Psalmist also addresses his Psalm to God, and indeed Jesus Christ is also Son of God.  The Psalmist says “Your throne, O God, is forever and ever…Therefore, Your God has anointed You.”  The only way this makes sense is to realize that God the Son, the son of man, is God and He is the Son of the Father.  Although the Trinity is a great mystery which is almost impossible to understand, in these few words the Psalmist summarizes the truth.  God’s throne is forever, and the God the Father anoints God the Son, who is also the son of man.

“In Your majesty, ride out victoriously for the cause of truth and meekness and righteousness:”  Ps. 45:4

The Psalmist speaks to Christ, but he might as well be speaking to us.  Because God became incarnate and was born as man, He was, through His death and resurrection, building a bridge to the Father.   We are the ones, as Christ’s disciples, who can walk in His majesty.  We are the ones, because Christ has saved us from our sins, who can ride out into the world and into eternity “victoriously.”  And, because Christ is truth, meekness, and righteous, by riding out for Him, in obedience to Him we can also ride out for these things as well.

Tomorrow will be Christmas with our celebrations of gift-giving and merriment.  But as we do this, we need to reflect on the first verse of the Psalmist, as he writes “My heart overflows with a pleasing theme; I address my verses to the King; my tongue is like the pen of a ready scribe.”  Ps. 45:1.  Does our heart overflow in this season with a “pleasing theme?”

Our theme should be pleasing to us and to everyone – God was born into the world as a baby so that He could save me, and you.

So on this day let us listen to our heart and let us address our verses, our poem, our life and our life story, to Him, the King of Kings and Lord of Lords.  Let us rejoice!  But let us also proclaim…”The King has come … Come, let us believe in Him, worship Him, and obey Him.  Come, let us adore Him!”

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© 2016 GBF   All Scripture quotations are from the English Standard Version (2001), unless otherwise indicated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bread – Recall

December 5, 2016


Psalm 44

O God, we have heard with our ears, our fathers have told us, what deeds You performed in their days … You with You own hand drove out the nations, but them You planted…”  Ps. 44:1-2

This will be an interesting week because this Psalm begins one way and quickly turns to another.  A calamity has fallen on the people of Israel and they lament to God why?  But before the Psalmist writes about the calamity, he writes about God’s exercise of His power in the past to help Israel and its people.

There is a saying that those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.  However, when it comes to God, those who forget history forget who God is.

Recall of God’s blessings upon our nation, our families, and each of us personally is critical to anchoring us in knowing God, in knowing His faithfulness through all generations.  It is not enough in our tumultuous lives that our anchor to God be set in emotions, in the high of the moment, or in mountaintops, but in the deep past, in the valleys of despair, in the memory of rescue, of salvation, of gifts, of blessings, of hope, and of love.

In order for our ship to be stable on the stormy waters of life, our anchor must be placed firmly in God.  And even though God is here today and will be here tomorrow, it is in the past where His glory, power, and authority has been exercised over and over again for our benefit, laid in stone of history, there for the viewing if we but recall.

We celebrate Christmas this year, recalling the advent of the Christ-child in history.  We will celebrate Easter this year, recalling Christ’s death on the cross in history.  The Psalmist recalls God’s great deeds, the blessing of Sarah with children, the exodus from Egypt, the burning bush, the fall of the walls of Jericho, and many more large and small, written down in the past.

So, as we begin this week, let us recall our history as God’s people, both the ups and the downs, the weaknesses and the strengths, the times of obedience and disobedience, the power and the grace and the blessings and, yes, the flood and forgiveness and the cross and the resurrection, and, yes, the birth of hope for the world in the birth of Jesus.  Let us recall not only the great history God’s people but our own history as God’s son or daughter.

Let us place these recollections firmly in our memory and anchor ourselves in them.

Why, because we will need these recollections to anchor us in the coming storm, to remind us that, when God seems absent and uncaring, He is neither.  And to remind us that, even in defeat, in Christ there is victory.

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© 2016 GBF   All Scripture quotations are from the English Standard Version (2001), unless otherwise indicated.

 

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