Bread – Controversies

March 27, 2009


Readings for Friday, March 27

            from the Book of Common Prayer:

            Jer. 23:1-8; Rom. 8:28-39; John 6:52-59

            Psalms 95, 102, 107:1-32

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There are controversies in the church among Christians.  Have been, are, and in all likelihood will be until the Lord returns.  Who knows, maybe when the Lord returns there will be controversies about whether He threw the right people into the fiery pit or whether the saints who are ruling with Him are really doing a good job.

 

In today’s readings lie two great controversies.  I’ll let you guess what the first one is from this reading from Romans:

 

“And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him, who have been called according to His purpose.  For those God foreknew He also predestined to be conformed to the likeness of His Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers.  And those He predestined, He also called; those He called, He also justified; those He justified, He also glorified.  Rom. 8:28-30.

 

If you haven’t already guessed it, we call this controversy by various names, but for shorthand I will call it the fight over the doctrine of predestination (and the role, if any, of free will in salvation).  Wonderful source of lengthy discourse and argument, spilling over into separation of the church into defined camps.

 

The second controversy arises from Jesus’ own words.  Again, I’ll let you guess:

 

“Jesus said to them, ‘I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life in you.  Whoever eats My flesh and drinks My blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day.  For My flesh is real food and My blood is real drink.  Whoever eats My flesh and drinks My blood remains in Me, and I in him….'”  John 6:53-56

 

One might have a little problem figuring out this controversy, because this passage can be tied to so many.  The first was one of the first charges which were levied against Christians by the pagans, and that was that they were cannibals.  Since no Christian has ever practiced cannibalism, it was quickly apparent that the plain meaning of this quotation is not the real meaning of this saying, but if you stretch your mind you can see that an allegorical reading of this quotation collides with a literal interpretation (thus tying to another controversy about how one is to read the Bible).  A third controversy this can relate to is how we as Christians are to treat the bread and wine during the Sacrament of Communion – whether as the real Body and Blood of Jesus Christ (the real presence doctrine), a simple memorial to Christ’s work on the cross, or something somewhere between.  Another wonderful source of lengthy discourse and argument, spilling over into separation of the church into defined camps.

 

Now why go through this?  I suspect your mind has already gone to my wording about the controversies, wondering how on earth I could have used one concept or word rather than another, and building your arguments against whatever position you may think I have.  It is a wonderful exercise of reason and doctrinal purity, driving us to delightful distractions as we build intelligent arguments to show how right we are.  I can and do do it.  And so do you.

 

But there are two other readings today which bring home what we are really about.  The first is from Jeremiah:

 

“‘I [God] will place shepherds over them who will tend them, and they will no longer be afraid or terrified, nor will any be missing,’ declares the LORD.  Jer. 23:4

 

“…nor will any be missing…”  Is this not the heart of God?  Is the heart of God that we have correct doctrine, that we “win,” the argument, or that none of His sheep will be missing?  I know I work awfully hard to make sure I have correct doctrine, that I understand the Word of God, and that I am obedient to Him in many things.  But do I share His heart for His missing sheep?  What have I done today to seek out His missing sheep and to bring them into the fold, where they will “no longer be afraid or terrified.”  This questions causes all controversies to fade.

 

But there is more in today’s readings.  In the Psalms appointed for today, there is this:

 

“…For the LORD is a great God, the great King above all gods.  In His hand are the depths of the earth, … The sea is His, for He made it, and His hands formed the dry land.  Come, let us bow down in worship, let us kneel before the LORD our Maker; for He is our God, and we are the people of His pasture, and the flock under His care.”  Psalm 95:3-7

 

And again:

 

“But you, O LORD, sit enthroned forever, your renown endures through all generations … Let this be written for a future generation, that a people not yet created may praise the LORD…In the beginning You laid the foundations of the earth, and the heavens are the work of Your hands.  They will perish, but You will remain …But You remain the same, and your years will never end.”  Psalm 102: 12, 18, 25-26\

 

And again:

 

“Give thanks to the LORD, for He is good, His love endures forever … Let them exalt Him in the assembly of the people and praise Him in the council of the elders.”  Psalm 107: 1, 32

 

What is to be gathered from these readings in Psalms except that God is sovereign; He is King?  What is to be gathered from these readings except that He is to be worshiped, bowed to and knelt before, exalted in all places?

 

Let’s see, my job is worshipping the Creator and Savior, God and King, finding His lost sheep, and bringing them into sanctuary where they are safe.  I suspect if I were really doing these things, my time to worry about the “right” position in these various controversies would be greatly diminished.  Besides, if I were sovereign and knew the solution to all controversies, why would I need God and why would I need faith in Him?  Hmm…seems like Satan asked my forefather and foremother that question a long time ago and no good came out it.  Maybe I need to focus on my job.

 

Could I make a perhaps unwelcome suggestion — Maybe you do too.

 

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Lord, help us to love your Word, incarnate in Jesus Christ and written in Scripture.  Help us Lord to come to you and to bring others to you.  Help us know that you are God and we are not.  Help us Lord to recognize Your timing and to accept it.  Assist us Lord through the indwelling of the Holy Spirit to be both willing and obedient servants.  It is only through the merits of your Son Jesus Christ that we are empowered to even make this prayer.  And so we thank you and praise you!  Amen.

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Bread – Timing

March 18, 2009


Readings for Wednesday, March 18

            from the Book of Common Prayer:

            Jer. 8:18-9:6; Rom. 5:12-21; John 8:12-20

            Psalms 81, 82, 119:97-120

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You have heard it said that timing is everything.  I would appear from our readings today that this saying may have some grounding in Scripture.

 

We read today about three different kinds of timing.  The first is the timing of our own destruction if we are not saved.  The second is the timing of God in history.  And the third is the timing of our ministry on earth.

 

First, Jeremiah speaks – “The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved.” Jer. 8:20.  What a dreadful statement.    I am reminded of the song “Summertime” – “summertime, and the living is easy…”  It is easy in the summer.  It is warm, crops are growing, there really is no fight against the elements (except for sunscreen), breezes are blowing, and life seems to slow down a little and get a little easier.  Jeremiah reminds us that there will be a time of no more summers, no more easy living under the gaze of a merciful God providing for the common good, no more opportunity to obtain food.  In that time, “we are not saved” unless we have taken advantage of the “summer” to become saved.  The timing is now to be saved, while the opportunity exists, because there will come a time when summer is gone, the harvest has ended, and those people who are left over will not be saved.

 

Second, Paul speaks about the timing of God in history — “You see, at the right time, when we were still powerless, Christ died for the ungodly.” Rom. 5:6.  You might fairly ask the question, “Well, what about those Old Testament characters, weren’t they powerless too and yet Christ didn’t die then but later?”  That is a fair question from our perspective, but it assumes something about time and God.  We recognize time as linear, having a past, present, and future.  God is not bound by our limitations.  We cannot judge God’s actions in time according to our standards of time.  We cannot subject God’s judgment and timing to our standards.  So, Paul is right.  God did act at the “right time.”  He always acts at the right time, even though for us it may appear to be too late or too early.

 

The third type of timing presented into today’s Scripture reading is the timing of our own ministries on earth, the timing of which is not in our hands.  As reported in John, Jesus was speaking to the Pharisees and they challenged Him on the grounds that He was speaking only for Himself and therefore lacked sufficient witnesses to prove the truth of what He was saying.  He said that He had two witnesses, Himself and His Father, but that the Pharisees couldn’t see that because they did not know the Father, but only knew their own religious rules and procedures.  As noted by John, “Yet no one seized Him, because His time had not yet come.”  John 8:20b.  We understand this to mean His crucifixion and resurrection.

 

Jesus’ ministry on earth aimed for the cross from the get-go.  But that ministry would not begin and would not end until the time was right.  It would begin with His seizure by His accusers, but this seizure would not take place and could not take place until the time for it had come.

 

So we now know a lot about timing and how it fits into our lives.  If we are not saved, the time is now while summer is still here.  If we are saved, then we know that God brought Jesus Christ into the world to save us, sinners, at exactly the right time, when we were powerless to save ourselves.  Once we are saved, our opportunity for ministry will come about at the right time, at the point when God has ordained it, and it will end at the right time.

 

Have you put off accepting the gift of salvation? Act while you can.  Are you feeling ungrateful?  Think about the perfect timing of God in bringing Jesus into the world to save you, when you could not save yourself.  Are you feeling restless, wanting to get on to the next project or ministry?  Rest in the moment, knowing that God will call you when your time to serve Him has come.

 

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Lord, help us to love your Word, incarnate in Jesus Christ and written in Scripture.  Help us Lord to come to you and to bring others to you.  Help us know that you are God and we are not.  Help us Lord to recognize Your timing and to accept it.  Assist us Lord through the indwelling of the Holy Spirit to be both willing and obedient servants.  It is only through the merits of your Son Jesus Christ that we are empowered to even make this prayer.  And so we thank you and praise you!  Amen.

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Bread – Deception

March 15, 2009


Readings for Monday, March 16

            from the Book of Common Prayer:

            Jer. 7:1-15; Rom. 4:1-12; John 7:14-36

            Psalms 77, 79, 80

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Do not trust in deceptive words and say ‘This is the temple of the LORD, the temple of the LORD, the temple of the LORD!…But look, you are trusting in deceptive words that are worthless.” Jer. 7:4, 8

 

One time I was reading a book about evangelism and the author asked the question: “How do the lost know that they are lost?”  A very good question, when you think about it.  It is a good question because, in order for the lost to know that they are lost, they have to have a destination which they want to go to and they have to have some sense that there is a right way to get there.  In Christian terms, our destination is eternity in the presence of God and we know the right way to get there, through faith in Jesus Christ.  But even if you have a destination, unless someone tells you the right way to get there, unless someone gives you a map, then how do you know that there is a right way, much less know what that right way is?  So the short answer to the question of “How do the lost know that they are lost?” is that they don’t unless someone intervenes in their life and tells them.  Jesus tells us to do just that to all those people who are lost and don’t know it.

 

The word of God through Jeremiah quoted above implies a similar question.  “How do the deceived know that they are deceived?”  In other words, if one lives in a deception and knows no truth, then how does one know that he or she is deceived?”

 

I think there is an answer to this question, and it is implied in the quote above.  One can figure out if one is being deceived by asking oneself “Who or what am I trusting?”  Trusting for what?  I would say the big things – why am I here, who am I, what in life is worthwhile and what is worthless, what is love really, what happens when I die?

 

So maybe the question is “Who or what am I trusting to answer the big questions I have?”

 

And the answer to that can be many things – we can put our trust in fortune, in good health, in science, in education, in brain power, in other people, in our spouse, in our priest (pastor, minister, brother), and in luck, to name a few.  Jeremiah would say that if you trust any of those things, if you are not trusting God and Him only, then you are being deceived.  Jeremiah asks the question, if you are trusting deception – deceptive words – when why are you going to church?  Why are you saying “the temple, the temple, the temple,” as if you can neutralize the deception you believe in by mere religious attendance or repetition?

 

What or who do I trust?  If one can not say God and only God, then one is being at least partially deceived.

 

Why do we believe and trust in deceptive words?  Maybe it is because we are being deceived.  Or maybe it is because we like the benefits of deception (in C.S. Lewis’ Narnia Chronicles, the “Turkish Delight”).  Or maybe it is because we really don’t trust God.  Or maybe it is some combination of some or all of the above.

 

But there is a way to break the cycle of deception.  Trust in God and Him only – and you will know the truth and it will set you free.  John 8:32.

 

Are you being deceived?  Then, to paraphrase what God told Jeremiah to tell Judah – stop it!

 

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Lord, help us to love your Word, incarnate in Jesus Christ and written in Scripture.  Help us Lord to come to you and to bring others to you.  Help us know that you are God and we are not.  Assist us Lord through the indwelling of the Holy Spirit to be both willing and obedient servants.  It is only through the merits of your Son Jesus Christ that we are empowered to even make this prayer.  And so we thank you and praise you!  Amen.

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Bread – Honesty

March 11, 2009


Readings for Wednesday, March 11

            from the Book of Common Prayer:

            Jer. 3:6-18; Rom. 1:28-2:11; John 5:1-18

            Psalms 72, 119:73-96

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From our reading today in Jeremiah, repeating what God told him:  “I thought that after she [Israel] had done all this [evil], she would return to me but she did not…In spite of all this, her unfaithful sister Judah did not return to Me with all her heart, only in pretense…Faithless Israel is more righteous than unfaithful Judah.”  Jer. 3:7-11

 

Both the nations Israel and Judah (now divided) were doing the same kinds of evil – raising up other gods, following those other gods, ignoring the true God, disobedience to the true God, lack of faith, etc.  However, the Lord notes that there responses were totally different.  Israel responded by not repenting at all.  Judah responded by repenting in pretense only, not in reality.  God looks at the two and declares that Israel is the more righteous of the two.

 

Why?  I would say that it is because Israel was brutally honest.  It wanted no part of the Lord’s gifts, His commandments, His revelation, or His exclusiveness.  Since it wanted no part of God (except, of course, His common blessing so that they could continue to sin in peace and comfort), at least it was honest in saying so.  We might analogize Israel in these circumstances to be like the secularists of today.  They want no part of God, His ways, His commands, His love, or His discipline.  But they will gladly wake up every day to the sun and revel in God’s common grace.  God would say at least they were honest, even though their destruction is sure and they lack wisdom.

 

On the other hand, Judah pretended to repent of its sins and return to the Lord.  How funny is that?  Like you are going to trick God into thinking that your heart has really changed?  Like you can hide something, anything from God?  Judah was being dishonest with God, and as a result God placed them a step below Israel on the righteousness scale.

 

We might analogize Judah in these circumstances to many, many self-labeled Christians today.  They speak the right words.  They perform the right acts.  But their heart is far from God and whatever obedience they have to Him and His Word is no more than a cover-up for what they are really thinking and doing.  There is a real danger that many people who are currently “turning to God” in their times of economic or personal trouble are merely acting in pretense and not reality.

 

Now in today’s reading in Romans, Paul warns us about casting stones of judgment when we are doing the same things.  And I admit that there are many times I lip sync Christianity, so I dare not judge.  However, you know if your relationship with Christ is built upon honesty or dishonesty, so judge yourself.

 

Now God loved both Israel and Judah and at the end of the reading in Jeremiah today, God says that he will reunite both and restore the reunited Israel-Judah to its lands.  Jer. 3:18 [parenthetically, this prophesy has been partially fulfilled in our lifetime in our sight]  But God is clear in saying that He would rather have a relationship built upon honesty, even if built upon faithlessness [no faith], than one built upon dishonesty or unfaithfulness [alleged faithfulness bearing no fruit, reflected in no action or obedience].

 

Try to be honest with God.  Today, make a promise to yourself and God that you will be brutally honest with Him every minute of every day.  And watch what happens.  I think you will be surprised (and blessed).

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Lord, help us to love your Word, incarnate in Jesus Christ and written in Scripture.  Help us Lord to come to you and to bring others to you.  Help us know that you are God and we are not.  Assist us Lord through the indwelling of the Holy Spirit to be both willing and obedient.  It is only through the merits of your Son Jesus Christ that we are empowered to even make this prayer.  And so we thank you and praise you!  Amen.

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Bread – Fear

March 6, 2009


Readings for Friday, March 6

            from the Book of Common Prayer:

            Deut. 10:12-22; Heb. 4:11-16; John 3:22-36

            Psalms 40, 51, 54, 95

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“And now, O Israel, what does the LORD your God ask of you but to fear the LORD your God …”  Thus begins our reading in Deuteronomy today.

 

I have been in many Christian teachings and discussions where this word “fear” is discussed.  Usually, the conclusion of such teachings and discussions is that the type of fear being talked about is now “fraidy cat” fear but “awesome presence” fear.  In other words, what is often taught and concluded is that the type of fear being referred to is a highly reverent fear, an awe, which we might experience meeting the President of the United States, as opposed to the type of fear which immobilizes.

 

But the Hebrew word (Strong # 3372) being used actually has both connotations, both the “awesome” type of fear and the “fraidy cat” type of fear.  As described in the Hebrew Notes to the Hebrew-Greek Key Word Study Bible (NASB)*, “There are two main types of fear described by (# 3372): (1) the emotional and intellectual anticipation of harm, what one feels may go wrong for him and (b) a very positive feeling of awe or reverence.”

 

Often the second definition is emphasized to the exclusion or diminution of the first.

 

I suggest that this is a mistake.  We should be afraid of God – very, very, very afraid of God.  Perhaps if we were more afraid of God we would be more appreciative of what Jesus Christ did for us on the cross.  Perhaps if we were more afraid of God, we would really come to understand and appreciate what the writer of Hebrews has to tell us in today’s reading:

 

“Therefore, since we have a great high priest who has gone through the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold firmly to the faith we profess.  For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are — yet was without sin.  Let us then approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.”  Heb. 4:14-16

 

My Translation:  God came to earth as man so that man could stand before God without being burned to a crisp.  The way this happens is by true belief in Jesus Christ, the one who stands between us and God as the great high priest who intercedes for us and protect us from the wrath of God which we justly deserve, but which we do not get because Jesus already satisfied God’s demand for justice for the sins of all those people, including me, who truly believe in Him.

 

Let’s face it.  If we were instantly transported into the throne room of God, to stand before Him without the intervention of Jesus Christ, we would be burned to a crisp for our sins.  We’d be destroyed into nothingness or thrown into the pit of Hell, neither of which is a future I want to have.

 

So Moses instructs us first to fear God.  Why?  So that we will totally appreciate His mercy and His grace.  So we will be so grateful for what God has done for us that we will be joyfully obedient to His commands and joyfully loving and serving Him with our entire heart and soul.

 

There is a reason that Proverbs says that “the fear of God is the beginning of wisdom.”  Prov. 9:10   I would go further.  What Moses says is that the fear of God is the beginning of everything.  Do you want to know how to love?  Fear God.  Do you want to know how to succeed?  Fear God.  Do you want eternal life?  Fear God.

 

And then do what He says.

 

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Lord, help us to love your Word, incarnate in Jesus Christ and written in Scripture.  Help us Lord to come to you and to bring others to you.  Help us know that you are God and we are not.  Assist us Lord through the indwelling of the Holy Spirit to be both willing and obedient.  It is only through the merits of your Son Jesus Christ that we are empowered to even make this prayer.  And so we thank you and praise you!  Amen.

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*Quotation is from the Hebrew-Greek Key Word Study Bible (NA SB) (Ed: Zodhiates) (1990 AMG Publishers)

 

 

 

Bread – True Belief

March 4, 2009


Readings for Wednesday, March 4

            from the Book of Common Prayer:

            Deut. 9:13-21; Heb. 3:12-19; John 2:23-3:15

            Psalms 49, 53, 119:49-72

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In Deuteronomy today, we have Moses recounting his descent from the mountain with the two tablets of the law, only to come upon the golden calf.  Moses tells the nation Israel that “You had turned aside quickly…”  Deut. 9:16b  This is probably an understatement.  Moses had barely disappeared to speak to God on the mountain before Moses brother and chief assistant (chief priest) Aaron and most of Israel turned away to false gods.  He might have well said “you turned aside instantly” and he would have been accurate.  There was no staying power in the people.

 

In Hebrews today, we read why there was no staying power.  The writer of Hebrews says “See to it, brothers, that none of you has a sinful, unbelieving heart that turns away from the living God.  But encourage one another daily, as long as it is called Today, so that none of you may be hardened by sin’s deceitfulness….Who were they who heard and rebelled?  Were they not all those Moses led out of Egypt?…And to whom did God swear that they would never enter His rest if not to those who disobeyed?  So we see that they were not able to enter, because of their unbelief.”  Heb. 3:12-13, 16, 18-19.  Here a significant connection is made.  What is described as the act of disobedience (the “turning aside”) in Deuteronomy is now described in Hebrews as the act of unbelief.  Disobedience and turning aside arises from unbelief; unbelief causes disobedience and turning away to other gods.

 

Jesus speaks of the same thing in the Gospel of John today.  The reading starts off with this statement that “many people saw the miraculous signs he was doing and believed in His name.”  John 2:23.  But immediately following this, we see that Jesus did not rely upon the stated “believed in His name.”  We are told that “Jesus would not entrust himself to them, for He knew all men.”  John 2:24.   The remainder of the reading today is Jesus’ conversation with Nicodemus (in part), where He tells Nicodemus that no one can see the kingdom of God unless he is reborn, reminding Nicodemus that it is only the Spirit of God which gives birth to spirit.  John 3:3-8.

 

So we are confronted in these readings with two types of belief.  One belief is stated – “I follow Moses.  I follow God.  I believe in the name of Jesus Christ.”  That kind of belief results in turning away as soon as the opportunity presents itself.  It is marked by disobedience, chasing after false Gods, and rebellion.  It is the type of belief which is no more than the natural extension of the natural man.  It is unholy because it does not have its origins in God, but in man.  It is the kind of belief which Jesus would not rely upon, because He knows what is in man’s heart.  It is a counterfeit belief, unable to save, unable to transform, unable to cure, with no power and no strength.  Yet, in many respects it is the kind of belief which the modern church encourages.

 

Then there is the second type of belief – one which is born of the Holy Spirit speaking to our spirit, one which is initiated by God, made holy by God, given power and strength by God, saving and transforming, marked by obedience and staying the course, standing the ground.

 

We don’t like to talk about in “nice” Christian circles, but there is a litmus test for which kind of belief you have.  It is the litmus test of obedience.  It is the litmus test of staying the course and standing.  Now it is not an absolute litmus test, for none except Jesus is perfect and none except Jesus is without sin.  However, it is a tendency litmus test — in which direction are we moving?  The Israelites moved as far away from God as fast as possible after church was over (Moses left).

 

After church is over, which direction are you moving in?  The answer will say a whole lot about whether your belief is stated or real, whether it comes from man or from God.

 

And if you are concerned that your belief may just be of your doing, then let’s pray with the boy’s father who asked Jesus for a miracle – “I do believe; help me overcome my unbelief.” Mark 9:24.  And take the miracle when it comes.

 

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Lord, help us to love your Word, incarnate in Jesus Christ and written in Scripture.  Help us Lord to come to you and to bring others to you.  Help us know that you are God and we are not.  Assist us Lord through the indwelling of the Holy Spirit to be both willing and obedient.  It is only through the merits of your Son Jesus Christ that we are empowered to even make this prayer.  And so we thank you and praise you!  Amen.

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Bread — Résumés

March 2, 2009


Readings for Monday, March 2

            from the Book of Common Prayer:

            Deut. 8:11-20; Heb. 2:11-18; John 2:1-12

            Psalms 41, 44, 52

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We are talking about résumés, the things you fill out to tell prospective employers all the good things you’ve done, all the positions of responsibility and leadership you have had, and all the education you have had.

 

In today’s economic climate, many people are filling out résumés and there are entire educational programs you can take and buy which will tell you how to write the “winning” résumé.  Of course these have to be accurate (because people only want to hire “honest” people), but they also have to tell a story of increasing ability, responsibility, power, wisdom, wealth, and knowledge (because we only want to hire people who are “growing.”)  The résumé cannot say that you are Superman (because that position is taken by your future boss),  but it certainly can say that you are Superman’s first cousin.  And, of course, the résumé must also reveal a darker side of your personality, like the obverse of a coin, so that your interviewer will know that you too are human.  For example, if your résumé shows that you have achieved great things, it is OK to say that one of your problems might be that you “try too hard.”  Thus, you have pulled off the great human trick of showing that you can recognize your faults and be humble, but in a positive way, because who would not want to hire an employee who “works too hard?”

 

Perhaps this is partly why our Christianity is so weak.  On Sunday, we consider what may be written on our tombstone.  The rest of the time we consider what can be written in our résumé.

 

God through Moses in Deuteronomy warns us today about the pride creep represented by our résumés.  God tells us to be very, very careful not “to forget the LORD your God, failing to observe His commands …” Deut. 8:11.  Otherwise, when we have fine things we can put on our résumé, “You may say to yourself, ‘My power and the strength of my hands have produced this wealth for me.'” Deut. 8:17.  When you are tempted to think this way, Moses says clearly “But remember the LORD your God, for it is He who gives you the ability to produce wealth … If you ever forget the LORD your God and follow other gods and worship and bow down to them, I testify against you today that you will surely be destroyed.”  Deut. 8:18-19

 

Let me propose a question.  When you write your résumé and are sitting there staring at it, ask yourself whose résumé is it.  Is it yours?  Does it reflect the things that you have done?  Or is it God’s working through you?  In other words, does it reflect what God has done which you have been privileged to participate in?

 

There is nothing wrong with the résumé and there is nothing wrong with the accomplishments it reflects.  There is everything wrong if you consider it yours.

 

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Lord, help us to love your Word, incarnate in Jesus Christ and written in Scripture.  Help us Lord to come to you and to bring others to you.  Help us know that you are God and we are not.  Assist us Lord through the indwelling of the Holy Spirit to be both willing and obedient.  It is only through the merits of your Son Jesus Christ that we are empowered to even make this prayer.  And so we thank you and praise you!  Amen.

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